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THE ARMY WAY

“Leadership is influencing people – by providing purpose, direction, and motivation – while operating to accomplish the mission and improving the organization!” Where did this excellent quote on leadership come from? Interesting but it comes directly out of the official Army Leadership Manual. This description fits exactly what the church, the army of the Lord, should be focusing on. Three words stand out needing more of our attention and understanding.

The first is influencing! This means motivating and loving others in the mission for the mission. As leaders we are to influence people into an active relationship with Christ, with the church, and in their community. We need to develop a system that gives people the tools they need to stay on the path of spiritual vitality. Church systems are to be reproducible and interconnected processes by which the church actualizes and achieves its mission.

The second is operating!  As leaders we are called upon to create plans, develop systems and manage their execution so that the mission is achieved. Our role is to help people find and follow Jesus. Do we have a clear discipleship pathway and a leadership development pipeline? Do people know what “next steps” they need to take as they progress in their spiritual maturity? Please notice the emphasis is on the mission and not on the individual. God is all about the team!

The third is improving! There is always room for improvement and we should all want to get better in everything we do. A great way to improve your team is by dedicating ourselves to adding value to those around us and to the organization for the betterment of the mission. If we want to change tomorrow we need to begin doing the necessary things and taking the necessary steps today. Once again make sure you think of a clear process of next steps people need to take.

The key concept is reproducible and it is not reproducible if it is too complicated and confusing. Confusion on what to do next paralyzes any organization and brings an advancing army to a screeching halt. This is why II Timothy 2:2 defines a clear process. “And what you have heard from me in the presence of many witnesses, commit to faithful men who will be able to teach others also.” Our responsibility is to create the pathways to a clear and understandable goal.

Systems are needed and necessary to sustain the relational capitol you have work diligently to build up. Gary Rohrmayer writes, “Functional structures are the links that enable all the church systems to function harmoniously.”

Here are five areas with key questions that will help you keep your structures effective.

  1. Mission outcomes – what results are you looking to achieve?
  2. Ministry flow – what are the steps needed to achieve those results?
  3. Focus on organization structure – who will ensure that those results are being achieved?
  4. Organization flow – how do we keep people informed and involved as we achieve our goal?
  5. Focus on charting the course – how do we keep our structures effective? We need to know where we are headed and what success looks like to us. Focus on goals, steps, who is responsible, how do you cast the vision, and how can you be effective.

What do healthy and unhealthy systems look like? Here are a few thoughts I heard recently on healthy systems while attending Courage to Lead preconference at Exponential West 2017.

You must place high trust in your leaders by allowing them to lead. Sometimes team leaders are given a position with no authority but that will eventually create problems and frustrate them as they realize they have responsibility but are powerless to do anything about it.

They need to earn that trust with a proven track record. The trust level increases as information is given with clearly defined job descriptions. Remember, confusion paralyzes so a trusted leader is one who communicates well where they are headed, how they are going to get there, and how you can best help them in that journey. Resist the temptation to micromanage. Empower them to make decisions and oversee their ministry in a Christ honoring way.

Have very few committees but have a lot of conversations. Being over structured almost always guarantees less effectiveness. The best decisions are always made as a team in a group and not on an island. Those you lead will not buy-in unless they are given the opportunity to weigh-in. Develop an information process that gives everyone the right to be creative and to offer feedback. Allow decisions to be made at the lowest possible level.

Celebrate the right things and have fun along the journey. When you see something that is being effective you first want to celebrate it but you also want to do more of it. Do not allow team members to sit around with frowns on their faces. Remind them that the joy of the Lord is their strength. The question we must ask is whether the frowns on their faces are because they are imitating us? Someone creates the atmosphere and environment so make sure it is a positive one.

Stay simple and do not allow the system to become too complicated. If you are having meeting upon meetings and nothing is really working then the system is broke and needs an overhaul. Think about downsizing the busyness and focus on becoming simple. Bureaucracy is defined as an administration characterized by too much red tape and routine. Make sure you are not just meeting to meet. There must be a defined purpose for the meeting.

Think through the “Army Way” by focusing on influencing, operating, and improving. This way you can focus on executing the mission you have been called by the commander-in-chief to carry out!

 

SEQUENTIALISM

Now there is a word you just do not use every day. At least I don’t but when leading your church to have a mission’s strategy it needs to be addressed. There are several missiologists who have even warned churches of the “heresy of sequentialism.” Sequentialism is “separating into components what really ought to be embraced all at once. It is a very linear approach to our outreach where we begin to believe and think that we must reach our Jerusalem, and then reach our Judea, next our Samaria, and then and only then do we reach out to the ends of the earth.”

In Church Planting Movements David Garrison talks about deadly sins of church planting and one of those is sequentialism. It is the idea that things have to be done in order where first you do this and then you do that. It affects the way we view worldwide missions but can also negatively impact discipleship in the local church. We imply, and even teach outright, that you cannot effectively share the gospel until you reach a certain level of discipleship. When a person steps over the line of faith they probably know more people far from God and have a closer relationship with them then they ever will.

Acts 1:8 gives us the focus of our church mission’s strategy but the text makes it clear that it is to be done simultaneously. Some churches seem to be arguing over choosing one location over the other. You hear things like, “What about about us?” or “Why aren’t we going where people are responding?” Implying that we must choose between focusing locally or globally but that is not the biblical approach. Matter of fact it says “all” of Judea, which should cause us to also have a burden for church planting right here in America. The reality is we do need more churches here and everywhere!

First, develop a biblically sound and comprehensive strategy for how your church needs to be involved in the Great Commission.

How are you helping to reach people with the gospel in your Jerusalem, “all” of Judea, Samaria, and to the ends of the earth? What strategies do you have locally, regionally, nationally, and globally? In Philippians 1:5 Paul thanked those who had decided to partner with him in the advancement of the gospel. It is a privilege to help church planters and missionaries in their gospel efforts.

Second, seek the Lord in prayer on what “next steps” your church should take to be obedient in all of these areas simultaneously.

Jesus prayed all night about whom He should ask to be the leaders He would develop to champion this movement. The church in Antioch set aside and sent out Barnabas and Saul following a focused time of corporate prayer. Think through the P-5 multiplication process of praying, preparing, partnering, parenting, and planting. How can you become more intentionally involved in those areas?

Third, make sure to cast the vision and get the entire church involved in the process.

When it is birthed in prayer everyone owns the vision. It is not a few leaders who decide what should be done and who the church should support. The Holy Spirit is able to speak to the entire congregation so that it will be “their” vision and “their” responsibility given to them by Him. As a church, decide how you will best leverage your gifts, talents, and resources for carrying out the Great Commission.

Fourth, use wisdom in how you use your financial resources.

David Garrison says, “Money, though not inherently evil, is also not essential to Church Planting Movements, but it can produce a quick burst of energy. When a missionary’s hunger to see quick results prompts him to hire pastors and construct church buildings with foreign funding, he has bit the Devil’s Candy!”

“Building a movement on foreign funds is like running a machine with an extension cord that stretches across the ocean. When the movement reaches the end of the cord’s length, it will abruptly stop. A Church Planting Movement must have an internal engine and internal fuel if it is going to flourish.”

Fifth, set up some principles that guard you from building ministries that are not sustainable over time.

Consider a plan of thirds on projects. The rule of thumb here is to never proceed on a project where the local congregation cannot invest a least a third of the necessary funds. The congregation should be investing in the project as well. Make sure the focus is on finding people and reaching them with the gospel and not just providing a facility.

Whenever you give too much or give it for too long you are potentially creating an attitude of dependence. The temptation will almost always be to accept the funds for as long as they offered. Amazingly and quite often when the congregation is forced to step up and move forward in faith God provides their needs though their own sacrificial giving. The receiver of funds may not ever change as long as the giver of the funds is willing to continue with their generosity. Yes, you can give too much and for too long!

As you focus on simultaneously being obedient to His command in Acts 1:8 make sure that whoever you partner understands this principle: under promise and over deliver. As you develop your plan to be missional locally, regionally, nationally, and globally consider that you invest in the harvest by investing in church planting. The harvest is the future and we need to be willing to put our gifts, talents, resources, and money where our mouth is. It will involve risk and there is never a 100% success guarantee.

“Risking for God is dangerous, but not risking is more dangerous.” – J.D. Greear

TIPS FOR YOUR CHURCH MISSIONS STRATEGY

Have you begun working on your church’s mission strategy? Have you determined how you can become more involved than just giving a monthly percentage of your tithes and offerings? Are unreached people groups in your vision and conversations? Have you prayerfully considered how your church might plant a church? How will you determine your level of involvement in God’s mission strategy? You can pray, prepare, partner, plant, and be a parent. We must continue to be committed to the multiplication of disciples, leaders, and churches!

Missions-minded churches jump from Jerusalem to the ends of the earth. Missional churches focus on Jerusalem, “All” (emphasis added) Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. Gary Rohrmayer says, “Church planting is the way a denomination invests in the harvest. The harvest is the future.” How true and never forget that your church was once a church plant. A church’s mission strategy begins by building a sending culture where it becomes natural because that is what churches do! They equip, empower, and then release leaders to live sent.

First, we really are better together!

Philippians 1 gives a great overview of how a local body of believers helped support the ongoing church planting efforts of the apostle Paul. He expresses his gratefulness to them in verse 5, “because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now.” Every church must decide whom they will work with in the furtherance of the gospel. That is the purpose of an association of churches so that together they can be a part of fulfilling the Great Commission. With whom will you cooperate for the advancement of the gospel?

When we examine our motives of working with others for the sake of the gospel we must remember that our main impetus is not how many will be saved. Certainly we hope many will find Christ. Our primary motivation must remain that God has commanded us to go and make His name known to every tribe and every nation. That parameter includes all of Judea and all of Samaria. Yet one church-planting leader commented, “The hardest money I have ever raised is for North American church planting.” This will not work without partnerships.

Second, we need to have a system in place that assesses those we support.

In Phil. 1:7 Paul says, “you are all partners with me in grace both in my imprisonment and in the defense and establishment of the gospel.” Are those we are sending and supporting qualified? In Acts 13 the church decided to send Barnabas and Saul. They had proven themselves in their local church. We cannot afford to be sending people out who are not biblically sound in the gospel. Also, have they been faithfully sharing the gospel with others?

It should be apparent that they are able to defend the gospel and that they have also put their knowledge into practice. Have they already used their Great Commission skills in sharing the gospel, discipling converts, and developing leaders locally? There are assessment tools that enable us to better evaluate skill sets but we should always look first to how they are serving, or not serving, in their local church. If they have not been faithful in their local church it is unwise to expect a change of location to correct the problem.

Third, we must be willing to do whatever it takes to advance the gospel.

Paul says this in Phil. 1:12, “Now I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has actually resulted in the advance of the gospel.” We know that Paul is referring to his imprisonment and the hardships he endured such as beatings, shipwreck, and being stoned. He is saying that it was all worth it and was all in God’s plan. Really, we usually are not sacrificing by what we give but we are being given the privilege and blessing of investing in kingdom work.

Recently, I read of a missionary who was offered a very nice position back here in America. The person who contacted him let him know there were 100 other people ready to take this job but he was holding it for him believing he was the person for the job. While it was meant as a compliment the missionary heard it differently. He did not want to move to a ministry position where there were 100 people ready to do the job when there was no one standing in line for his. We must be willing to accept the positions no one else is lining up for!

Fourth, we must live our lives in a manner worthy of the gospel.

Phil. 1:27 goes on to say, “working side by side for the faith that comes from the gospel.” How do we give credibility to the gospel? We begin by teaching that if someone says they believed, but they have never obeyed, then they probably never really did believe. Biblical belief is repentance in action. If you have truly believed you will obey – but if we don’t obey we really don’t believe. A changed life happens because of a relationship with Jesus Christ and that individual’s life will back up their testimony.

Your church may have to overcome a bad testimony in your community. If you have been known for your disunity then you must confess, repent, and seek to “stand firm in one spirit, with one mind.” How is your church viewed in your community? Are you known for your love and compassion? Do most people believe that the community is better off because of your presence there? Do they see a unified body of believers “working side by side” who love one anther and love them as well? Do they see your church practicing what you preach?

Developing a Church Missions Strategy

Does your church have a strategy of how to fulfill the Great Commission? A system is needed to improve the challenge and the calling to carry the gospel to every nation. It involves mobilizing our body of believers to be the hands and feet of Jesus locally and globally. J.D. Greear says it correctly, “If a church is not engaging in mission, it really has no point in existing.” The Great Commission is not a calling for a special elite few but a mandate for every follower of Christ.

Greear asks some pretty poignant questions. “Are there mission fields in our backyards that could contribute to the global spread of the gospel that we have overlooked because they don’t enhance the bottom line of our church? Are we evaluating ministry opportunities only by how they benefit us, or are we looking at the benefit they can bring to Jesus’ kingdom even if there is nothing in them for ours?” How is your church involved in the spread of the gospel around the world? How could you improve your church’s involvement?

Your church must first have a solid biblical, doctrinal, and theological foundation to direct His mission. Have you clearly developed and articulated your Christology, Ecclesiology and Missiology? Here are some values that we must embrace if we are going to be obedient in reaching our Jerusalem, and in ALL (emphasis added) Judea. Recent surveys tell us that there are well over 160 millions unclaimed for Christ. The mission field is right before us and there is still a great redemption flow in this country.

In II Corinthians 5:14-15 Paul says, “For Christ’s love compels us; since we have reached this conclusion: If one died for all, then all died: And He died for all, so that those who live should no longer live for themselves, but for the One who died for them and was raised.” Most of what God wants to do in society happens outside the church facilitated by the hands of ordinary people. In the book of Acts, 39 of the 40 miracles recorded occurred outside the church. The greatest obstacle is not finances but rather people willing to live on mission daily.

First, we must look at our motives!

Paul states that His motive is the love of Christ as he looks at Him and is amazed by His grace. As we learn to adore Jesus we are then glad to renounce everything we have to follow Him. It has been well said, “In Christ, I can give up all that I have because in Christ I have all that I need.” When we consider His unconditional love, and we worship Him for who He is, then we will want to serve and sacrifice for Him. Our motive is to make the glory of the Lord known to every tongue and tribe.

Second, we must measure what it will require to fulfill the Great Commission.

Paul says that he sacrificed so much for the mission that people thought he was a mad man. We are willing to sacrifice for what we worship. Risk is scary but not risking for God should be even scarier. Are we more concerned with our own comfort and concerns then living radically for Christ? J.D. Greear says, “We who live by His death should therefore no longer live for ourselves, but should lay down our lives and resources for others as He laid down His for us.”

Third, we then embrace our call to a ministry of reconciliation.

You need to think about those you know who need to know what you know. God has placed you where you are to utilize your gifts and talents as a platform to spread the gospel. Whatever vocation you are in is God’s means of blessing the world and when you do what you do with excellence it gives you the opportunity to tell others about Him. How will you leverage your gifts, talents, and assets for the advancement of God’s kingdom?

Fourth, be willing to pray dangerous prayers.

All too often we pray safe prayers such as God bless me, help me, protect, heal me, and provide for me. Dangerous prayers are risky and life stretching. They are filled with boldness and daring faith. Here is one dangerous prayer, “Lord send me wherever you want me to go and reach whomever you want me to reach.” This is a missional prayer that aligns you with His mission and promotes His glory. This prayer positions you to be usable by Him in any way He chooses.

Fifth, accept that it is your responsibility.

It is God’s will for every one of His followers to be involved in His mission from the moment they decide to follow Him. The Lord has strategically placed you on mission for Him. Ministry and sacrifice is not a secondary experience that happens to only a few, privileged Christians. Every one of us are called to be ministers and to also be missionaries in “All” of Judea.  How will your church leverage your gifts, talents, and resources to be involved in the partnership of the advancement of the gospel?

Romans 10:15 says, “How beautiful are the feet of those who announce the gospel of good things.” Many lack confidence in their ability to share the gospel. Maybe you do not feel qualified and worry you will get something wrong.   We are responsible for handling the gospel correctly but here is some good news, pun intended. The power of the gospel is not in us or in our presentation. Only the Holy Spirit has the power to open a heart and transform a life. We must clearly articulate the gospel and then trust the Holy Spirit to work on the heart of that individual!

Prayerfully consider how your church can leverage its influence to make a gospel impact in your community. Who has God placed in your community and circles of influence that needs to hear a clear presentation of the gospel from you?