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Archives for : July2019

Next Steps

Raising children helps you to understand the concept of the game, follow the leader.  Children copy and mimic whatever the one who is first in the line is doing.  Children mimic adult behavior whether that behavior is good or bad.  Most parents can tell about an embarrassing moment when their child repeated what they said even though they did not want it repeated.  One day they will no longer be as compelled to mimic your behavior but will determine for themselves what they will or will not do.  We must teach them why we do what we do not only show them.

We are told that most adults leave the church between the ages of eighteen and twenty-two.  Could it be that they were shown what to do but were never taught why they were suppose to do it?  Maybe we have not done well at discipling them in understanding how essential and critical being a part of local congregation is to their spiritual walk? If the only reason a teenager attends the church is because of the friends they have there then they might not need the church anymore when they make friends outside the church.  

Fellowship is important and needed but there is much more to church membership.  Church membership does not seem to matter to many any more because there are such low expectations.  Churches seem to be experiencing very low levels of commitment.  Have we knowingly or without realizing built a culture of low expectations?  Low expectations usually equal low commitment.  This is why a new member class is important because it can explain what is expected as a church member and what they can expect from their church.

You will need to decide what your new member class will look like, how long it will last, and what information you will include in the class.  This class is a great on-ramp in connecting new people to your vision and mission statement, the way your church functions, and how they can get connected in building relationships and serve in a ministry.  Thom Rainer says the three key ingredients of any new member class are information about your church, expectations of members, and a clear assimilation process.  Think expectations, information, and attitude.  

Some ingredients to include within these areas are clarifying the gospel, doctrine, leadership in the church, and how to get involved.   You want to clearly present what they can expect from your church, and what your church expects from all of its members.  Give them a copy of your doctrinal statement to read and come back ready to ask questions. Focus on the essentials of the faith such as salvation by grace alone, through faith alone, by Christ alone and the inspiration of the scriptures.   Help them to better understand the importance of Biblical truth.

One goal of this class is giving them the information they need so that six months down the road you will hopefully not hear, “If I had known that I never would of joined.”  Another goal is to challenge them to be functioning members of your church and not spectators.  It gives them a clear process of how they can get involved.  They are taught the importance of small group Bible studies, serving on a ministry team, and how they can be discipled one-on-one.  You clarify your purpose (the what) but you also show them your process (the how).  

Make this entry level class a priority by asking all prospective members to attend.  This is not meant to be a qualifying school but rather a way of informing them of what Biblical membership looks like.  A great inexpensive resource you can give those who attend is I Am a Church Member by Thom Rainer.  This is a great reminder to those desiring to become a part of your congregation of how important it is to have the right attitude.  There are six pledges in the book to help them understand the gravity and responsibility of becoming a church member.

Some churches have decided to not use the term “member” because of what it has come to mean in our culture.  When someone thinks of membership it usually refers to what rights you have.  Thom Rainer says, “We join our churches expecting others to serve us, to feed us, and to care for us…God did not give us local churches to become country clubs where membership means we have privileges and perks.  He placed us in churches to serve, to care for others, to pray for leaders, to learn, to teach, to give, and, in some cases, to die for the sake of the gospel.”

You must determine how long your class will last but make sure it does not last too long.  Some churches do an overview with a luncheon and others last as long as twelve weeks.  Do not feel like you must cover everything but rather give an overview of how your church carries out the mission of God.  The temptation is that more is better but not necessarily.   Stress Bible truth and expectations but also show them how they can step into an environment where they can grow.  Clearly state your expectation for maturing in Christ through your process of discipleship.  

Teach your vision and mission statement in the new member class by explaining the action steps required.  These action steps describe what the member should do next in order to grow and move through the process.  The process does not guarantee transformation, only God transforms, but it places the member in a position that encourages movement and growth as they desire to become more like Christ.  Make sure your mission statement clearly describes what they should do next. Higher levels of commitment will require higher levels of expectation.