Rss

  • twitter

Fake It Till You Make It

image

 

Once again, this all too familiar statement was made to me, “I’ll just fake it till I make it!” The transparency was refreshing but the reality of how often I have lived by the same motto convicted me. All too often we procede ahead without knowing what we are doing, where we are going, how we will get there, and refusing to admit we need help.

We think, All we need is a little more time and we will figure it out? We reason wirh ourselves, Maybe we will know where we are after two more right turns? ¬†We hope, If I act like I know what I’m doing maybe nobody will notice I don’t have a clue?

One of my favorite commercials is when an emergency occurs that requires the expertise of a doctor. Then the man helping is asked, “Are you a doctor?” To which he replies, “No, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.” Unfortunately, not knowing what I am doing has never held me back.

The temptation can be to never admit that we do not have all the answers and we have not figured everything out. That is why I am committed to being a lifelong learner. Somebody out there knows what I need to know and we should always be on the outlook for them.

Why do we “Fake it till we make it?” Could it be that we are afraid of what people might discover about us? Could we also be afraid that we are no longer the authority on the subject? Maybe we are people pleasers and so we are more focused on impressing them?

Here are some attitudes and things that might be indicators that you are trying to fake it till you make it:

  • First, you think you must always have the answer! This is whay I do not like playing Bible trivia games. It is a no-win situation for a preacher. If you win, “Well of course you did, you’re a preacher!” If you lose, “And you call yourself a preacher?” We do not have to always have the answer and we need to admit it when we don’t. If we are not careful we can be tempted to make up an answer instead of finding the real answer. One of the best things you can say is, “You know, I’m not sure on that but I will do my best to find out!”
  • Second, I know what I am doing! Sometimes we are afraid to admit that we do not have it all together and that we are in way over our heads. We may not know know how to handle certain situations but there are people around us who do. Who is that knows what you need to know? Who do you need to talk to that can help you to figure it out? First, ask the Lord! Ed Stetzer says it this way, “Wise planning is not what I decide and then ask God to bless it, but I ask God what He desires of me, and then I pursue it!”
  • Third, I don’t need anybody else. I can do this! Maybe you can, but that is never the best way because two are always better than one. Tony Morgan has said, “A solo leader might draw a weekend crowd, but it takes a team to create healthy systems that foster sustained growth and opportunities for life change.” Should we be willing to do it alone if we have to? Definitely! Is that the best plan? Never! Be careful to not fall into the thinking that if you want it done right you have to do it yourself! If you do not have help now then begin training others so they can help.
  • Fourth, I’m tired of trusting people and getting burned! No doubt about it, people will let you down and disappoint you but it is worth the risk. Teamwork is messy and it takes……work! It doesn’t just happen but you have to be willing to pour into other people’s lives without any guarantee it will ever be beneficial for you or your ministry. Paul said this, “Demas has forsaked me having loved this present world!” The very people with whom you spend a lot of time and invest the most in may walk away but it is still worth it!
  • Fifth, shouldn’t they know what we are doing by now! Maybe so, but remember, vision leaks. Communicate what the need is and what the job requires up front. Make it clear! D.A. Horton said, “Disappointment takes place when you expect too much from someone you barely communicate with.” All too often we are guilty of placing people in positions without properly preparing them. Could it be that we are faking it till we make it because we were never trained either? In Teams That Thrive Ryan Hartwig and Warrin Bird say, “Less than 20% of leadership team leaders have received special training in how to lead teams.”

People appreciate transparency and authenticity. No one likes a fake even if they have the best intentions. They do love it when a leader says, “I need your help!” They want to know that it is not only their information and effort that matters but their opinions matter as well. Refuse to fake it till you make it!