Rss

  • twitter

Eye Candy

The story is pretty universal where you go “just to look” and you come home with something you said you never meant to purchase. More furniture than you intended to buy, or even needed, but you came home with it and are now wondering how you will pay for it. Or you went to the car dealership with a plan to not go above a certain monthly payment but left with far more than you bargained for. The sales world knows that a very large percentage of Americans are “impulse buyers” and they are trained on how to capitalize on that reality.

What happened to our resolve to only “look” and especially to stay within our budget? One explanation could be that the “eye candy” got the better of us. Eye Candy can be defined as: “visual images that are superficially attractive and entertaining but intellectually undemanding.” We see something we like and it is appealing to what we want and can even be an item we need. We begin to rationalize a way we can go home with something we never intended to buy in the beginning of the process.

This shows up in our lives when we realize we are unable to give to the Lord the way we should. Our budget is so stretched by what we just had to have that now there is little room for our tithes and offerings. We make sure we have all the things we desire but forget about investing as we should into the Lord’s work. Haggai 1:4 says, “Is it a time for you yourselves to live in your paneled houses, while this house lies in ruins?” What a blessing to see many who do with less so that they can continue to remain faithful to giving cheerfully unto the Lord.

Churches can also give into this temptation when their budget becomes so strapped by membership “needs” that the ability to fund ministry, help the needy, and support missionaries becomes impossible. It is not easy to keep this in balance. Take a look at your church budget and all too often 80-90% is used to take care of the membership. There is not a biblical percentage that guarantees you are spiritual or not but we should be challenged to do more for our cities, our communities, other churches, and to reach those who are far from God.

Churches also need to be aware of “eye candy.” We begin with a particular vision and core values and we are determined to never stray from them but something happens along the way. We see what other churches have and certainly God wants to bless our church with those same things? One area that is especially challenging is when it comes to buildings. We have bought into the American phenomenon that “bigger is always better.” Certainly there is a time to build and buildings are necessary tools for the ministry.

Please consider that maybe there is a kernel of truth in this following question. Are we preaching against our people’s consumerism and keeping up with the Joneses while our church is guilty of the very same thing? This is not meant to cause us to judge anyone’s motives except our own. We should rejoice when others have more or better than us and be careful of coveting or thinking that is the only metric for successful ministry. We all must be willing to admit that the “eye candy” of buildings, programs, technology, and a host of things can be tempting.

Have we so focused on growing bigger that we are doing so at the expense of kingdom growth, multiplication, and reaching entire regions with the gospel? Has our vision become so focused on our own individual congregation that we are unwilling to consider the damage it could be doing to advancing the gospel? We hear things like; “we need to take care of our own members first.” Here are a couple of things to consider before investing too much into a building, programs, or other potential “eye candy” that could keep us from carrying out God’s purpose.

First, do you really need it? That is difficult to discern at times, but there are ways to determine the answer by beginning with prayer. Also, have you considered the long-term growth and trends in your area? If a 15 or 30-year note will restrict your ability to minister and help your community maybe there is a better or other option?

Second, are you willing to look at other options? Maybe you could go to two services or even three! Almost every situation is different but what is the best way to invest the resources God has given you? Certainly, we do not want to bury what God has given us or hold onto it too tightly, but maybe He has another way He wants us to invest them.

Third, will it divert funds that should be going to bless your city and evangelism? Many see the church as more interested in what they own than in helping those in need. Yes, the poor will always be with us but we should be willing to think functional and practical far more than extravagant and fancy. What percentage of your church budget is designated for reaching people who are far from God?

            It is easy for a church, even without realizing, to give into the temptation of the eye candy of nicer, bigger, and newer! People want to know that they matter and are loved. Relationships have been the currency that matters the most to people for a very long time and that will not change anytime soon. The thinking of “build and they will come” came and went a long time ago. A good friend said, “They will come where it is exciting but they will stay where they are loved!”