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Leadership Fears

All of us have fears such as spiders, snakes, or maybe tight closed in spaces.  We often fear the future and worry about our jobs, our kids, and our churches.  We can fear not being liked or even of being misunderstood.  We can have a fear of being an outcast or of being rejected by our friends.  We can even be afraid of what the Lord may ask us to give up, what He may ask us to do, or where He might ask us to go.  Fear is real and its greatest danger is that it paralyzes us and we are then unable to do what we need to do.      

Recently, as Dr. Mark Livingston was teaching on leadership he talked about three areas where we might fear man as leaders.  First, we fear what they can do to us.  Second, we fear what they can take from us and then, third, we fear losing what someone might give us.  We know that fear is real and it is an issue that we all have to face.  Fear keeps you from doing things you want to do and sadly, things we should be doing.  We are told that the number one fear most people have is public speaking and many times we have not spoken up when we should have.

  1. What man can do to us, is the awareness of how they can create problems, headaches, and difficulties as we strive to lead our congregations.  There are those who can make every step and every decision much harder than it should be.  They are difficult by nature and sometimes we have even encountered wolves in sheep’s clothing.  Sometimes we perceive opposition but all that is needed is more information. Opposition should not shock us because Paul certainly experienced it (Acts 25:7; I Timothy 5:17).   
  2. Maybe we fear what they can take from us.  There are those who have the ability to undermine our leadership, create opposition, and even take our position from us. You know, the influencer whom the congregation always listens to first.  Please remember when certain people think they have lost their control and influence they will not play fair.  They think they can say and act as they want but they also know that a leader is not allowed the same latitude.  The leader is definitely held to a higher standard.
  3. The other fear we sometimes have is losing what someone could potentially give us.  We fear that certain people might leave and take their finances with them. Unfortunately, there are those who will even strive to use their resources to control the church to make sure things are done their way.  We should never allow anyone to hold the church hostage, including ourselves.  We have witnessed people catering to certain individuals because of what they might get.  James 2 addresses that in the early church and we also must resist the temptation of showing favoritism.   

How do you find courage in the midst of fear?  

  1. Ponder about how big God really is.  In the model prayer Jesus begins with, “Our Father in heaven, Your name be honored as Holy.”  A great song says, “Your name is a strong and mighty tower. Your name is a shelter like no other.  Your name, let the nations sing it louder ‘Cause nothing has the power to save but Your name.” Think about His names such as Creator (He who made you), Father (He who loves you), Savior (He who forgives you), Shepherd (He who guides you), and Shelter (He who hides you.)   
  2. Believe and trust that God is aware of your situation and circumstances.  In Exodus 3 God tells Moses, “I have observed the misery of My people in Egypt, and have heard them crying out because of their oppressions, and I know about their sufferings.”  God has not forgotten, He has not abandoned you, and He never will.  Jesus said, “I will not leave you as orphans, I will come to you.”  Yet, so often we act like orphans whining and griping because we do not believe that God has our back.  We think it is up to us to scratch and claw and make things happen.
  3. Be willing to wait on Him to show up. Looking at the life of Joshua we see that his source of courage came from God because he was loyal, faithful, and willing to be lonely as he waited for Moses on Mt. Sinai.  Moses was busy meeting with God and was preoccupied with what God was telling him face to face and friend to friend (Exodus 24).  What was Joshua doing?  He was waiting in silence until Moses returned.  This says something about a man when he is waiting on God’s direction but he does not panic, despair, retreat from his post, or desert his friend.

Joshua type courage comes from remaining completely loyal to his assignment even when he is by himself and probably very lonely. Courage develops, as we trust God in the silent interludes of life.  There are times a leader is called by Christ to come apart from everyone else to be alone with Him.  We must resist the temptation of thinking we will be forgotten, opportunities will pass us by, and we will end up missing out on something.  The quiet times and the resting times can be the most difficult and the hardest to not fear and to not worry.

Dr. Livingston gave us an excellent quote from When People are Big and God is Small by Ed Welch, “All experiences of the fear of man share at least one common feature: people are big.  They have grown to idolatrous proportions in our lives.  They control us.  Since there is no room in our hearts to worship both God and people, whenever people are big, God is not.  Therefore, the first task in escaping the snare of the fear of man is to know that God is awesome and glorious, not other people.”