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Face Your Limits



There is a leadership principle that I have heard in conferences and read in leadership books that says,  “Lead out of your strengths and forget about your weaknesses.”  There is wisdom in that and this is not meant to dispute that principle completely because of the focus of the teaching when it was said.  We should be challenged though to recognize the truth that we all have limitations, yes we have weaknesses.  Biblically, we are told that God gets the glory through our weaknesses.

Paul in II Corinthians 12:9-10, “But He said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is perfected in weakness.’  Therefore, I will most gladly boast all the more about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may reside in me.  So I take pleasure in weaknesses…..For when I am weak, then I am strong.”  

You are not called to ignore your weaknesses but to surrender them to the One who strengthens you.  The question has to be asked, “How do we bring the most glory to God?  Leading out of our strengths or leading out of our weaknesses?”

A case could be made to lead out of our strengths because the Lord made us and formed us with certain gifts and abilities.  These should be used for His glory and surrendered for His purposes.  It is our limits (weaknesses) that bring Him the most glory and praise because we cannot take any of the credit.  

Maybe your struggle is impatience but as you abide in Christ you can bear the fruit of patience.  We then become keenly aware that it is only because of His working in our lives that we can be patient at all.

Pete Scazzero has really helped me to look closer at embracing my limits so that God’s power could be manifested.  Much of the content in this article comes from his materials and has challenged me to realize that limits are simply God’s gifts in disguise for His grace to show up.  

You realize that even though you are the leader you are in way over your head.  That actually places you right where He wants you to be so that He can show up and show off.  It causes you to look to Him and trust Him. 

  • Moses was limited by slow speech and yet he led 3 million people out of Egypt for 40 years.  
  • Jeremiah was limited with a melancholy disposition and yet his writings have encouraged many people about the heart of God for thousands of years.  
  • John the Baptist was limited by a semi-monastic lifestyle and yet he was the one who was able to clearly see that Jesus was the Son of God.  
  • Gideon was limited by the size of His army and yet he won a victory he could not of won with his own resources.  Our limitations are opportunities for God’s power to show up.

We should not ignore our limits but rather begin looking at them as openings for God to step in and do great and mighty things.  Acknowledging our limits causes us to cry out to Him in desperation, “I cannot do this without you!”  

A biblical example of the wrong kind of leadership is Jacob.  He was unwilling to wait on God’s promised blessing and connived and cheated his brother Esau to secure that blessing.  Jacob was always manipulating those around him instead of trusting God. 

God eventually humbles him by dislocating his hip and he would walk with a limp the rest of his life.  The reality is that we are all Jacobs and we all walk with a limp.  It is much easier to hold on, be anxious, and controlling than to trust God.  We would rather make things happen and grab what we believe God has for us than to wait on Him and His timing.  

  1. We believe that doing something has to be better than doing nothing, right?  We manipulate people and events because it is easier to be our own savior than to be still and know He is God!
  2. Stillness to many of us is like death itself.  You cry out, “No Lord, please let me do something.”  You want to help and you prefer taking matters into your own hands.  Lean into your limitations and know that you do not have to manipulate.  You can trust God knowing He will show you what to do and when to act upon His plan.  
  3. There is a time to be busy and working but there is also a time to sit at Jesus’ feet enjoying His fellowship and listening to His voice.  May our heart’s desire be to be drawn by the Holy Spirit and not driven by our inner compulsions.

Exodus 14:13 spells this truth out clearly, “But Moses said to the people, Don’t be afraid.  Stand firm and see the Lord’s salvation He will provide for you today; for the Egyptians you see today, you will never see again.  The Lord will fight for you; you must be quiet.”  

As a leader you think you always have to have a clear plan and be able to answer everyone’s questions, doubts, and confusion.  “What kind of leader will they think I am if I don’t have a solution for every situation?”

Pete Scazzero defines a limp as “whatever renders you dependent on God.”   It is where you are powerless and totally dependent upon Him.   Every believer has a limp and every church has a limp.  

Actually, our churches are a community of limpers.  Don’t deny or ignore them but rather realize that God’s grace is sufficient and in our weaknesses His power is made known!

2 Minute Challenge



In football there is what is known as the 2-minute warning.  At the end of each half both teams receive a warning that there is only 2 minutes before the game is over.  Some say this is when the game really begins and quite often the team who has possession of the ball last wins the game.  There can be more action in the last 2 minutes than there was the entire game.  They have practiced and prepared repeatedly for this 2-minute window of time to utilize it for maximum impact and can see great success through precise execution.

What if you utilized this same principle for the spiritual battle you face every day?   It is a way to have maximum concentration by refocusing on who God is and not what He will give you or do for you.  You desire to see Him for the magnificent God that he is in all of His grandeur.  This is different from your quiet time where you get filled up with His word and His presence and also different from interceding on behalf of others.  There is a time and place for those but this is purposely and intentionally, “looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith.”

The 2-minute challenge is a call to intentionally schedule times throughout your day where you take a minimum of 2 minutes to sit quietly before Him.  This is where you ponder in your heart how wonderful and awesome a God He is just like Mary pondered as she observed Jesus’ ministry.  In Psalm 119 David speaks of setting 7 times a day where he would pray.  Daniel had 3 daily, scheduled times where He would cry out to God and seek to be in His presence.  How will you make sure you build a safe place into you day where you can hear His voice?   

Jesus modeled this for us by going to a solidary place to intentionally step away from the distractions and pressures that were surrounding Him.  Listen to this wisdom, “If it took falling with His face to the ground and great struggle for the Son of God to submit Himself to the will of the Father, how can we expect that it will require any less than us?”  This is a willingness to seek Him purposely and spend time with Him while remembering that you are not doing this to get something but your goal to be with the great Someone! 

It requires slowing down in order to bring silence and solitude for a moment into your life.  It is walking in the rhythms of life He desires for you.  Dallas Willard refers to silence and solitude as, “The 2 most radical disciplines of the Christian life.”  Yet, it is almost impossible to live a healthy spiritual life without them.  Again, if Jesus sought out these times to hear from the Father how much more do we need to implement a plan to do the same?  Reading 2-3 pages from a devotional book or a chapter from the Bible each morning is not enough for what you will face each day.

Think of how your day can become difficult as you strive to remain in Christ.  Fatigue begins to set in through the busyness and activities because worldly pressure tries to conform you but you want to be transformed.  Abiding in Christ means you are remaining in Him so you can bear the fruit of the Spirit in difficult and challenging situations.  If you are not abiding then you are not connected and if you are not connected then you cannot bear fruit!  What you and every follower of Christ needs the most is to sit at the feet of Jesus continually throughout the day!

Think of how a balloon full of air is bouncy and resilient but slowly and surely over time it begins to leak.  Your morning quiet time is where you fill up for the challenges ahead but all day long you are leaking.  The world is great at sucking the spiritual life out of you.  When this happens your tendency and temptation to walk in the flesh and not in the Spirit is amplified.  This is when those triggers that set you off are intensified and temptations increase.  It is when you know the situation should not be bothering as much as it is.  Call out a 2-minute warning! 

The world we live in is constantly trying to squeeze us into their mold and into their worldview.  Listen to Romans 12:2 in the Phillips translation, “Don’t let the world around you squeeze you into its own mould, but let God re-mould your minds from within, so that you may prove in practice that the plan of God for you is good, meets all his demands and moves towards the goal of true maturity.”  You may be running on empty and at the end of your rope.  Maybe you need to cry out deep within your soul, “2-minute warning!”            

  1. Find a place, to the best of your ability, where you can sit in silence and solitude.  
  2. Set your timer for 2 minutes knowing you have to start somewhere.  That time can increase as you build this spiritual discipline into your life.  
  3. Focus on God’s grandeur and the awesome God that he is.  This is a time to “be still and know that He is God.”  
  4. Fight the temptation to allow your focus to drift to anything other than His beauty, attributes, mercy, and goodness.  
  5. Remember that He is God and there is no one else like Him!