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10 Steps to Make the Most Out of 2017

value-strategic-planning

Another year, 2017, is upon us and 2016 is about to be a part of history. Where does your church go from here and how do you enter this new open door of opportunity? There is a place for planning and strategy as you prayerfully seek what the Lord has for your ministry. Here are some thoughts about how to approach the new year so that you can intentionally lead those of whom God has given you the oversight.

First, plan a prayer retreat as soon as possible! If you have not already planned some time alone to seek God’s face and ask Him for direction, do it now. You must be very practical about this and pull out your calendar to schedule it. If you do not block the time off, it will not happen. A prayer retreat has been defined as “a time you set aside to go away and be alone with God.” You may want to fast from food but especially fast from your phone, the internet, and social media. Be still so you can hear His voice.

Second, utilize the S.W.O.T. analysis to determine where you are. Be willing to evaluate 2016 with other leaders in your church and determine your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (or challenges). Every church has strengths and it is good to celebrate what you are doing well. Yes, look at your weaknesses and challenges but do not overlook where God is blessing and be thankful for what He is doing in your midst. Then begin to focus on where you can improve in 2017 to be the church Christ designed you to be.

Third, become strategic and intentional. What practices do you need to put in place to accomplish what you believe God is leading you to fulfill? We say we value certain things like evangelism and discipleship but are there consistent patterns evident in our lives that support what we say we value? If people look at our schedules can they tell we value these things? If an outsider looks at our church budget what would they say your church values?

Fourth, remember that church culture begins to change with the language we use. Do you have a clear, concise, and simple mission statement? Have you developed a simple strategy that clearly articulates how you plan to carry out that mission statement? A mission statement is not a fix everything solution but it is a great place to begin the journey. We must remind our congregation regularly that God is able to do above and beyond all we think and even beyond what we can imagine.

Fifth, schedule a leadership-planning meeting to cast the vision for the future. There are several components that need to be a part of this process. This is a wonderful opportunity to hear from everyone about what they think should be the church’s focus. There are some helpful guidelines to follow but do not be afraid of constructive criticism and input. A creative think tank approach can accomplish great things. There should always be honest transparency with your leadership or you will never be able to move forward.

Sixth, determine some strategic imperatives that prioritize what you must focus on first. What are 3-5 items that you feel must be focused upon first? Be sure to remain focused on God’s heart and where the Holy Spirit is working right now. What are the “most” important things you must do to achieve your vision. We are assuming at this point that you know why you exist and what you desire to accomplish as a church. Make a list of what your leadership believes are imperatives and narrow it down to 3-5.

Seventh, develop goals for each of these imperatives to move you forward in reaching them. These imperatives can be new ministries, improving present ministries, or even stopping unproductive ministries. The key here is to list at least three goals for each strategic imperative that will help to make them a reality and not just an idea. You need to know what you need to know but that is only information. You also need to be passionate about that information but that is only inspiration. Involving the head and the heart is necessary but the next step through goals is involving the hands and the feet.

Eighth, designate what needs to be done and who is responsible for making sure it happens. This is where leadership can really drop the ball. Committees tend to be a group of people not involved in a particular ministry telling those who are involved what to do. Leadership teams always focus on what needs to be done and who is responsible. You must determine measurable objectives and then assign who is responsible for making sure it happens. Values are good but values with goals are even better.

Ninth, develop the leaders around you by giving them the resources they need. We say we want to develop more leaders but how much time are we actually spending doing that? We say we value defining and developing leaders but no mentoring or apprenticeship is occurring. The process is clear in the word of God that everyone needs a Paul as a mentor and then they need to find a Timothy to mentor. Find receptive, willing, and teachable potential leaders. Then develop a process to intentionally and consistently train them.

Tenth, seek others outside of your church and ministry to help. There is something to be said about “outside” eyes. We know the scriptures tell us that there is wisdom in the multitude of counsel. Somebody knows what you need to know, so find him or her and find out what they know. Somebody has been through what you are going through so listen to his or her story and learn from it. Somebody has been where you want to go so find out what that looked like for them. These godly advisors can talk you in off the ledge or they can motivate you to take that step of faith that you need to take.

Healthy people and healthy churches lead prayerfully, intentionally and strategically!

 

DEAD HORSE STRATEGY

Insanity has been defined as “doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”  Recently, I saw some dead horse strategies shared on Twitter.  I did a little investigating and found various lists on a couple of different web sites.  Honestly, I am not sure who should get the credit but this list is my compilation of what I felt were the top 21.   

One site shared Dakota tribal wisdom which says when you discover you’re riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.  Sometimes in the church we “beat dead horses” (doing the same thing over and over expecting different results).  Here are some Dead Horse Truths that will probably make you laugh but I pray will also cause us to do some soul-searching:

  • Buy a Stronger Whip.
  • Change Riders.
  • Threaten the horse with termination.
  • Name the dead horse “Paradigm Shift” and keep riding it.
  • Ride the dead horse “outside the box.”
  • Ride the dead horse “smarter” not harder.
  • Do a time management study to see if the lighter riders would improve productivity.
  • Keep saying, “This is the way we have always ridden this horse.”
  • Appoint a committee to study the horse.
  • Increase the standards to ride dead horses.
  • Appoint team to revive the dead horse.
  • Create training to increase riding ability.
  • Pass a resolution stating, “This horse is not dead.”
  • Arrange visits to other sites to see how they ride dead horses.
  • Harness several dead horses together for increased speed.
  • Declare ‘this horse is not too dead to beat.”
  • Provide additional funding to increase dead horse’s performance.
  • Form a commission to find uses for dead horses.
  • Re-classify the dead horse as “living-impaired.”
  • Get the horse a Web site.
  • Promote the horse to a supervisory position.

I imagine that a few of these sounded familiar to you as they did to me.    Hopefully, this will cause you to do some evaluation by asking two questions:

            1.  What is God saying to you through this humorous comparison?

            2.  What are you going to do about it? 

If even a couple of these are a part of your strategy you need to consider a new strategy!